scuttle

scuttle
{vb Scuttle, scurry, scamper, skedaddle, sprint are comparable when they mean to move briskly by or as if by running. Scuttle, scurry, and scamper all imply a rapid erratic progress of or as if of a small active animal but each may carry quite distinctive suggestions.
Scuttle tends to suggest an irregular, precipitous, and seemingly awkward gait (as of a spider or crab) in which speed often appears to be attained with effort landladies scuttling sideways like crabs in their crustacean silk gowns— Sitwell}
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a flock of sparrows scuttled like brown leaves over the pavement— Glasgow

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a little motorcar so small that it scuttled up the road, shot around, and stopped . . . with the abruptness of a wound-up toy— Wolfe

}
Scurry more often conveys the impression of a neat briskness (as of a mouse or squirrel) and often of abrupt changes in direction or speed
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sent him scurrying down a zigzag, crisscross, confused trail— Hervey

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[the squirrel] changed his mind. For no apparent reason he whisked about, scurried across the ground to the big elm, ran straight up the tall trunk, and disappeared—C. G. D. Roberts

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{

his still restless and curious intelligence went scurrying back through the past, savoring the quality of his experience, sniffing at souvenirs of his fights and his triumphs— James Gray

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Scamper suggests nimbleness in movement and typically applies to playful gamboling (as of children or young animals)
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tiny chipmunks no bigger than half-grown rats scampered fearlessly about— S. E. White

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lambs scampering after their mothers

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but it may stress urgency and then imply such motives as fear or need of shelter
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he could let his harried mind and spirit scamper in thought to this quiet male refuge and there find solace— Ferber

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the resulting roar . . . sent several persons under the marquee scampering into the store for safety— N. Y. Times

}
Skedaddle typically applies to human movement and distinctively implies a hasty departing for cause, sometimes even a panic flight
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the children around our place all own hideouts where they skedaddle whenever that old ogre, Work, rears his ugly head— Perkins

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the claim's played out, the partnership's played out, and the sooner we skedaddle out of this the better— Harte

}
Sprint implies movement at top speed and typically suggests an output of energy that can only briefly be maintained; it is particularly appropriate when the notion to be conveyed is one of an urgent effort of speed to attain an immediate end
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the commuter has no time to read the editorials as he sprints alternately from train to ferry and from ferry to train— Amer. Guide Series: N. J.

}
{

hoping to get a shot at a rabbit sprinting back to cover from far out in the field— T. H. White

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{

the . . . Brens at once began to blaze away and under their cover the rest of the patrol sprinted back about fifty yards— Majdalany

}
Analogous words: shoot, tear, dash, *rush, charge: *fly, scud: hurry, *speed, hasten

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

Synonyms:
, , , (affecting to be busy)


Look at other dictionaries:

  • Scuttle — Ein paar Einträge in einer Scuttle Installation Basisdaten …   Deutsch Wikipedia

  • Scuttle — may refer to:*Scuttling, deliberately sinking a ship by allowing water in *Coal scuttle, a bucket like container for coal *Shaving scuttle, a teapot like container for hot water *Scuttle, a fictional character in Disney s The Little Mermaid… …   Wikipedia

  • Scuttle — Scut tle (sk[u^]t t l), n. [OF. escoutille, F. [ e]scoutille, cf. Sp. escotilla; probably akin to Sp. escotar to cut a thing so as to make it fit, to hollow a garment about the neck, perhaps originally, to cut a bosom shaped piece out, and of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • scuttle — Ⅰ. scuttle [1] ► NOUN 1) a lidded metal container with a handle, used to store coal for a domestic fire. 2) Brit. the part of a car s bodywork between the windscreen and the bonnet. ORIGIN Latin scutella dish . Ⅱ. scuttle [2] …   English terms dictionary

  • Scuttle — Scut tle, v. t. [imp. & p. p. {Scuttled} (sk[u^]t t ld); p. pr. & vb. n. {Scuttling}.] 1. To cut a hole or holes through the bottom, deck, or sides of (as of a ship), for any purpose. [1913 Webster] 2. To sink by making holes through the bottom… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • scuttle — scuttle1 [skut′ l] n. [ME scutel, a dish < OE < L scutella, salver, dim. of scutra, flat dish] 1. a broad, open basket for carrying grain, vegetables, etc. 2. a kind of bucket, usually with a wide lip, used for pouring coal on a fire: in… …   English World dictionary

  • Scuttle — Scut tle, n. [AS. scutel a dish, platter; cf. Icel. skutill; both fr. L. scutella, dim. of scutra, scuta, a dish or platter; cf. scutum a shield. Cf. {Skillet}.] 1. A broad, shallow basket. [1913 Webster] 2. A wide mouthed vessel for holding coal …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Scuttle — Scut tle, v. i. [For scuddle, fr. scud.] To run with affected precipitation; to hurry; to bustle; to scuddle. [1913 Webster] With the first dawn of day, old Janet was scuttling about the house to wake the baron. Sir W. Scott. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Scuttle — Scut tle, n. A quick pace; a short run. Spectator. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • scuttle — [[t]skʌ̱t(ə)l[/t]] scuttles, scuttling, scuttled 1) VERB When people or small animals scuttle somewhere, they run there with short quick steps. [V adv/prep] Two very small children scuttled away in front of them... [V adv/prep] Crabs scuttle… …   English dictionary

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